‘Twas The Night Before Christmas | Christmas Eve Poem

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“Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse” This is one of the most famous poems in English literature. It has been translated into many languages and read by countless people around the world every year at this time.

Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse. The stockings were hung by the chimney with care in hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there.

The information on this page was last updated on December 4, 2020.

This poem is recited on Christmas Eve before we set out the mince pies and brandy for Santa Claus in our family.

“‘Twas The Night Before Christmas” is a Christmas poem written by Clement Clarke Moore that was originally published anonymously and later claimed to be his work. Although there is some debate over who wrote the poem, it is generally acknowledged that it is responsible for many of our current ideas of Father Christmas.

The poem was originally titled “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” and the opening line of the poem has become known as “Twas the Night Before Christmas.” The poem is also referred to as “The Night Before Christmas.”

In 1823, this poem was composed, or at least published. This is the version we prefer to repeat around Christmas. It’s had a few small changes throughout the year.

This poem, which is almost 200 years old, is still remembered for its vivid picture of Santa Claus.

 

Clement Clarke Moore’s A Visit from St. Nicholas

It was the night before Christmas, and not a creature, not even a mouse, was moving; the stockings were hung by the chimney with care, in the hopes that St. Nicholas would arrive soon;

The kids were all snuggled up in their beds. While sugar-plum images danced in their brains; And mama, in her kerchief, and I, in my hat, had just rested our minds for a long winter’s sleep.

When I heard a clatter on the lawn, I sprang from my bed to see what was the problem. I rushed like a flash to the window, ripping up the shutters and throwing up the sash.

The moon on the new-fallen snow’s breast, Added a noon gleam to the items below, When what seemed to my bewildered eyes, A small sleigh and eight miniature reindeer, on the other hand,

I realized right away that the tiny elderly driver was St. Nick since he was so energetic and fast. His coursers arrived faster than eagles, and he whistled, yelled, and addressed them by name:

“All right, Dasher! Dancer, now! Now it’s Prancer and Vixen’s turn! Comet, go! Come on, Cupid! Donner and Blitzen, go! All the way to the top of the porch! all the way to the top of the wall! Now take off! Get out of here! “Get rid of everything!”

When they encounter a barrier, like leaves do before a violent storm, they rise to the sky; So the coursers flew up to the roof of the house. With St. Nicholas and the sleigh full with toys—

Then, in the blink of an eye, I heard each tiny hoof prancing and pawing on the roof. St. Nicholas came down the chimney with a bound as I drew in my head and turned around.

He was covered in fur from head to toe, and his clothing were tarnished with ashes and soot; he was carrying a bundle of toys on his back, and he seemed to be a pedler just opening his pack.

His eyes twinkled like crazy! How delightful are his dimples! His cheeks were the color of flowers, and his nose was the color of a cherry! His droll little lips was pulled up into a bow, and his chin beard was as white as snow;

He had a wide face and a small round belly that trembled when he laughed, like a bowl full of jelly. He had a stump of a pipe in his teeth, and the smoke surrounded his head like a wreath; he had a broad face and a tiny round belly that shook when he smiled, like a bowl full of jelly.

He was fat and plump, a really merry old elf, and I couldn’t help but chuckle when I saw him; Soon, a wink of his eye and a tilt of his head assured me that I had nothing to be afraid of;

He didn’t say anything and got right to work, filling all the stockings; Then, with a jolt, he turned, placing his finger over his nose, and nodding, he ascended up the chimney;

He dashed to his sleigh, blew a whistle to his team, and they all flew away like thistles down. But, just as he drove away, I heard him scream, “Happy Christmas to everyone, and to all a good night!”

 

Twas Night Before Christmas Poem Poem from “Twas the Night Before Christmas”

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Twas The Night Before Christmas Poem

Twas the night before Christmas, and all through the house not a creature was stirring. Not even a mouse, for they were sleeping so soundly in their beds. Reference: twas the night before christmas and all through the house.

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Frequently Asked Questions

How do you say Twas the Night Before Christmas?

 

What was the original poem of Twas the Night Before Christmas?

Its a Christmas poem written by Clement Clarke Moore in 1823.

How many lines are in Twas the Night Before Christmas?

 

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